Spares and Tools while Traveling

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Spares and Tools while Traveling

Bud Izen
Picking up on what Poppa Jack said, when I went on my first trip (fall
2001) to Los Angeles, down Hwy 395 for most of the trip, I had not gone
on that long a bike trip in a really long time. So, I took the service
manual, and about every tool I thought I might need to fix anything I
thought might break and be able to be fixed while enroute. Weighed down
that top box something fierce. In fact, when I got back and read the
weight limitation I had to laugh out loud.

The bike spoils you. Every single trip since then, I seem to pack fewer
and fewer tools. Over 35,000 miles of long distance rides, I can tell
you what tools I have actually needed.

When my plastic fuel knob broke (nice metal one on there now), I needed
a few Torx drivers to take the plastic off and a small adjustable
crescent wrench to turn the shaft.

When my throttle piece broke (where the round metal tab on the end of
the throttle cable attaches inside the grip), I needed a #2 Philips
screwdriver to take apart the throttle housing and some electrical tape
to temporarily hold the rock that held the cable to the plastic piece in
place. Yes, a rock from the side of the road got me from Gilroy CA all
the way to the Triumph shop in Simi Valley.

When my haste to reassemble the bike prior to a trip to California
resulted in the wires falling off coil #1, I needed a few Torx drivers
to remove the plastic, a 10mm socket and driver to remove the tank, and
a soldering iron (and solder) plus electrical tape to solder all the
coil wires directly to the coils (three coils on the 900, one for each
cylinder of course).

Since adding a bus bar (see the files section) and so many additional
draws on the electrical system (voltmeter, temp gauge, 12v power outlet,
etc.) I always take a small inexpensive digital voltmeter, electrical
tape, solder, and soldering gun with me. Only had to use it once, but
you never know. I used to also bring the Battery Tender, but no longer.

I also keep a can of emergency tire repair, just in case. Haven't had to
use that either. On top of that, I bring a light air compressor for
keeping tire pressures up during long trips. Most of my trips are on
sizable chunks of back roads. Petrol stations with working tire pressure
stands are often problematic. I also bring a small can of chain wax, in
case the Scottoiler stops working or leaks (happened once).

Now, my traveling tool kit is ridiculously light. A few sockets, socket
drive, assorted screw- and Torx-drivers, the electrical repair stuff,
and that's about it. I have long since stopped bringing a full spanner
kit and also leave the service manual at home. Lots more room in the top
box for much more useful things, like binoculars and a change of shoes.

It's so much fun to own a reliable bike!

Bud Izen
'99 Platinum 900
Eugene OR


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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

adeux60
Luxury to leave all the tools behind. Only managed to have the nerve to do it a couple of times and I now carry a small 1/4" high quality socket set, a set of screwdrivers/levers and a set of good grips. I would love that tyre plug set that Gordon carries but then I would have to carry it also....I too used to carry my battery booster....
A2



--- In [hidden email], Bud Izen <budizen@...> wrote:

>
> Picking up on what Poppa Jack said, when I went on my first trip (fall
> 2001) to Los Angeles, down Hwy 395 for most of the trip, I had not gone
> on that long a bike trip in a really long time. So, I took the service
> manual, and about every tool I thought I might need to fix anything I
> thought might break and be able to be fixed while enroute. Weighed down
> that top box something fierce. In fact, when I got back and read the
> weight limitation I had to laugh out loud.
>
> The bike spoils you. Every single trip since then, I seem to pack fewer
> and fewer tools. Over 35,000 miles of long distance rides, I can tell
> you what tools I have actually needed.
>
> When my plastic fuel knob broke (nice metal one on there now), I needed
> a few Torx drivers to take the plastic off and a small adjustable
> crescent wrench to turn the shaft.
>
> When my throttle piece broke (where the round metal tab on the end of
> the throttle cable attaches inside the grip), I needed a #2 Philips
> screwdriver to take apart the throttle housing and some electrical tape
> to temporarily hold the rock that held the cable to the plastic piece in
> place. Yes, a rock from the side of the road got me from Gilroy CA all
> the way to the Triumph shop in Simi Valley.
>
> When my haste to reassemble the bike prior to a trip to California
> resulted in the wires falling off coil #1, I needed a few Torx drivers
> to remove the plastic, a 10mm socket and driver to remove the tank, and
> a soldering iron (and solder) plus electrical tape to solder all the
> coil wires directly to the coils (three coils on the 900, one for each
> cylinder of course).
>
> Since adding a bus bar (see the files section) and so many additional
> draws on the electrical system (voltmeter, temp gauge, 12v power outlet,
> etc.) I always take a small inexpensive digital voltmeter, electrical
> tape, solder, and soldering gun with me. Only had to use it once, but
> you never know. I used to also bring the Battery Tender, but no longer.
>
> I also keep a can of emergency tire repair, just in case. Haven't had to
> use that either. On top of that, I bring a light air compressor for
> keeping tire pressures up during long trips. Most of my trips are on
> sizable chunks of back roads. Petrol stations with working tire pressure
> stands are often problematic. I also bring a small can of chain wax, in
> case the Scottoiler stops working or leaks (happened once).
>
> Now, my traveling tool kit is ridiculously light. A few sockets, socket
> drive, assorted screw- and Torx-drivers, the electrical repair stuff,
> and that's about it. I have long since stopped bringing a full spanner
> kit and also leave the service manual at home. Lots more room in the top
> box for much more useful things, like binoculars and a change of shoes.
>
> It's so much fun to own a reliable bike!
>
> Bud Izen
> '99 Platinum 900
> Eugene OR
>


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Re: Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

Samuel Crider
Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research and
failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a product exist
that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the inside as well as in the
puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/patch combination repair.

Samuel
96 BBBB PB
New Orleans
On Nov 9, 2012 6:12 PM, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Luxury to leave all the tools behind. Only managed to have the nerve to do
> it a couple of times and I now carry a small 1/4" high quality socket set,
> a set of screwdrivers/levers and a set of good grips. I would love that
> tyre plug set that Gordon carries but then I would have to carry it
> also....I too used to carry my battery booster....
> A2
>
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], Bud Izen <budizen@...> wrote:
> >
> > Picking up on what Poppa Jack said, when I went on my first trip (fall
> > 2001) to Los Angeles, down Hwy 395 for most of the trip, I had not gone
> > on that long a bike trip in a really long time. So, I took the service
> > manual, and about every tool I thought I might need to fix anything I
> > thought might break and be able to be fixed while enroute. Weighed down
> > that top box something fierce. In fact, when I got back and read the
> > weight limitation I had to laugh out loud.
> >
> > The bike spoils you. Every single trip since then, I seem to pack fewer
> > and fewer tools. Over 35,000 miles of long distance rides, I can tell
> > you what tools I have actually needed.
> >
> > When my plastic fuel knob broke (nice metal one on there now), I needed
> > a few Torx drivers to take the plastic off and a small adjustable
> > crescent wrench to turn the shaft.
> >
> > When my throttle piece broke (where the round metal tab on the end of
> > the throttle cable attaches inside the grip), I needed a #2 Philips
> > screwdriver to take apart the throttle housing and some electrical tape
> > to temporarily hold the rock that held the cable to the plastic piece in
> > place. Yes, a rock from the side of the road got me from Gilroy CA all
> > the way to the Triumph shop in Simi Valley.
> >
> > When my haste to reassemble the bike prior to a trip to California
> > resulted in the wires falling off coil #1, I needed a few Torx drivers
> > to remove the plastic, a 10mm socket and driver to remove the tank, and
> > a soldering iron (and solder) plus electrical tape to solder all the
> > coil wires directly to the coils (three coils on the 900, one for each
> > cylinder of course).
> >
> > Since adding a bus bar (see the files section) and so many additional
> > draws on the electrical system (voltmeter, temp gauge, 12v power outlet,
> > etc.) I always take a small inexpensive digital voltmeter, electrical
> > tape, solder, and soldering gun with me. Only had to use it once, but
> > you never know. I used to also bring the Battery Tender, but no longer.
> >
> > I also keep a can of emergency tire repair, just in case. Haven't had to
> > use that either. On top of that, I bring a light air compressor for
> > keeping tire pressures up during long trips. Most of my trips are on
> > sizable chunks of back roads. Petrol stations with working tire pressure
> > stands are often problematic. I also bring a small can of chain wax, in
> > case the Scottoiler stops working or leaks (happened once).
> >
> > Now, my traveling tool kit is ridiculously light. A few sockets, socket
> > drive, assorted screw- and Torx-drivers, the electrical repair stuff,
> > and that's about it. I have long since stopped bringing a full spanner
> > kit and also leave the service manual at home. Lots more room in the top
> > box for much more useful things, like binoculars and a change of shoes.
> >
> > It's so much fun to own a reliable bike!
> >
> > Bud Izen
> > '99 Platinum 900
> > Eugene OR
> >
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> List guidelines: PLEASE NO grumpy replies, or replies which merely add
> agreement to a previous post. If a reply is only relevant to the original
> writer, please REPLY DIRECT to that person. No SPAM, no adult-oriented
> topics, and no postings of a political or commercial nature are allowed,
> except for personal items for sale/wanted. Please trim old messages to a
> minimum when replying.
>
>
> Post message: [hidden email]
> Subscribe:  [hidden email]
> Unsubscribe:  [hidden email]
> List owner:  [hidden email]
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
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Re: Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

Jack Byers
Hi Sam,
   Yeah, my Brother-in-law got a rock puncture on our Oregon trip,  
and broke out that plug kit you're talking about. It was about the  
easiest flat fix I've seen. It comes with a good set of instructions,  
and supplies enough for many more flats that will ever have  
(especially if you run an English style "Nail Flap" in front of the  
back tyre!"), but it doesn't have enough cartridges to inflate a  
tyre. It only took a few minutes to do the actual repair. The thing  
works sort of like a "Pop-Rivet" gun. The kit looks very useful, but  
it looks to take up a lot of space. I carry a can of "Flat-Fix", and  
a small tire plug kit. I also always carry my small bicycle pump and  
have a pressure gauge. I try to replace my small plug rubbers every  
couple of years if I remember. I can't recall the manufacturer, but  
I've seen them in motorcycle mags real often. My Bro said that his  
ride back to Bellingham was uneventful, and the plug looked fine  
after 750 more miles.
  Kindest regards,
    Poppa Jack
On Nov 11, 2012, at 4:58 AM, Samuel Crider wrote:

>
> Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research  
> and failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a  
> product exist that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the  
> inside as well as in the puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/
> patch combination repair.
>
> Samuel
> 96 BBBB PB
> New Orleans
>
> On Nov 9, 2012 6:12 PM, "a2 - inoperative emessages"  
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Luxury to leave all the tools behind. Only managed to have the  
> nerve to do it a couple of times and I now carry a small 1/4" high  
> quality socket set, a set of screwdrivers/levers and a set of good  
> grips. I would love that tyre plug set that Gordon carries but then  
> I would have to carry it also....I too used to carry my battery  
> booster....
> A2
>
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], Bud Izen <budizen@...> wrote:
> >
> > Picking up on what Poppa Jack said, when I went on my first trip  
> (fall
> > 2001) to Los Angeles, down Hwy 395 for most of the trip, I had  
> not gone
> > on that long a bike trip in a really long time. So, I took the  
> service
> > manual, and about every tool I thought I might need to fix  
> anything I
> > thought might break and be able to be fixed while enroute.  
> Weighed down
> > that top box something fierce. In fact, when I got back and read the
> > weight limitation I had to laugh out loud.
> >
> > The bike spoils you. Every single trip since then, I seem to pack  
> fewer
> > and fewer tools. Over 35,000 miles of long distance rides, I can  
> tell
> > you what tools I have actually needed.
> >
> > When my plastic fuel knob broke (nice metal one on there now), I  
> needed
> > a few Torx drivers to take the plastic off and a small adjustable
> > crescent wrench to turn the shaft.
> >
> > When my throttle piece broke (where the round metal tab on the  
> end of
> > the throttle cable attaches inside the grip), I needed a #2 Philips
> > screwdriver to take apart the throttle housing and some  
> electrical tape
> > to temporarily hold the rock that held the cable to the plastic  
> piece in
> > place. Yes, a rock from the side of the road got me from Gilroy  
> CA all
> > the way to the Triumph shop in Simi Valley.
> >
> > When my haste to reassemble the bike prior to a trip to California
> > resulted in the wires falling off coil #1, I needed a few Torx  
> drivers
> > to remove the plastic, a 10mm socket and driver to remove the  
> tank, and
> > a soldering iron (and solder) plus electrical tape to solder all the
> > coil wires directly to the coils (three coils on the 900, one for  
> each
> > cylinder of course).
> >
> > Since adding a bus bar (see the files section) and so many  
> additional
> > draws on the electrical system (voltmeter, temp gauge, 12v power  
> outlet,
> > etc.) I always take a small inexpensive digital voltmeter,  
> electrical
> > tape, solder, and soldering gun with me. Only had to use it once,  
> but
> > you never know. I used to also bring the Battery Tender, but no  
> longer.
> >
> > I also keep a can of emergency tire repair, just in case. Haven't  
> had to
> > use that either. On top of that, I bring a light air compressor for
> > keeping tire pressures up during long trips. Most of my trips are on
> > sizable chunks of back roads. Petrol stations with working tire  
> pressure
> > stands are often problematic. I also bring a small can of chain  
> wax, in
> > case the Scottoiler stops working or leaks (happened once).
> >
> > Now, my traveling tool kit is ridiculously light. A few sockets,  
> socket
> > drive, assorted screw- and Torx-drivers, the electrical repair  
> stuff,
> > and that's about it. I have long since stopped bringing a full  
> spanner
> > kit and also leave the service manual at home. Lots more room in  
> the top
> > box for much more useful things, like binoculars and a change of  
> shoes.
> >
> > It's so much fun to own a reliable bike!
> >
> > Bud Izen
> > '99 Platinum 900
> > Eugene OR
> >
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> List guidelines: PLEASE NO grumpy replies, or replies which merely  
> add agreement to a previous post. If a reply is only relevant to  
> the original writer, please REPLY DIRECT to that person. No SPAM,  
> no adult-oriented topics, and no postings of a political or  
> commercial nature are allowed, except for personal items for sale/
> wanted. Please trim old messages to a minimum when replying.
>
>
> Post message: [hidden email]
> Subscribe:  [hidden email]
> Unsubscribe:  [hidden email]
> List owner:  [hidden email]
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>

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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

greg95ns
In reply to this post by Samuel Crider
Hi Samuel, My last repair kit didn't work so well. I'm going to buy one of these.
http://www.aerostich.com/stop-and-go-pocket-plugger-tubeless-tire-repair-kit.html
I already have an air compressor I carry with me. It has a built in gauge. I stripped off the case to make it smaller.
Greg Andrews
'96 900 BRG
93,000 smiles

Samuel Crider wrote:
Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research and failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a product exist that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the inside as well as in the puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/patch combination repair.
Samuel
96 BBBB PB
New Orleans

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Re: Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

Samuel Crider
Thanks for the info. I'll have to check out the rivet gun contraption. I
just purchased a $10 compact "slime" compressor from the local WM. Cut off
the fused socket plug and attached the same unfused type as the charger
uses. So, when called upon she's either going to pump her little brains out
or burst forth into flames. Either of which beats blowing a bloody fuse
right in the heat of battle. Nevertheless, I deflated the front to do a
practice run. Worked fine except for a few minor issues. First being the
attached hose is very short and if it was 2mm shorter would be useless.
Second, the built in gauge sticks and pops foward every seven lbs or so.
Other than that she works like a charm with the added plus of just barely
tucking away in the nook in front of the tail light.

Samuel
On Nov 11, 2012 10:37 AM, "Greg" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Samuel, My last repair kit didn't work so well. I'm going to buy one of
> these.
>
> http://www.aerostich.com/stop-and-go-pocket-plugger-tubeless-tire-repair-kit.html
> I already have an air compressor I carry with me. It has a built in gauge.
> I stripped off the case to make it smaller.
> Greg Andrews
> '96 900 BRG
> 93,000 smiles
>
> Samuel Crider wrote:
> Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research and
> failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a product exist
> that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the inside as well as in the
> puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/patch combination repair.
> Samuel
> 96 BBBB PB
> New Orleans
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> List guidelines: PLEASE NO grumpy replies, or replies which merely add
> agreement to a previous post. If a reply is only relevant to the original
> writer, please REPLY DIRECT to that person. No SPAM, no adult-oriented
> topics, and no postings of a political or commercial nature are allowed,
> except for personal items for sale/wanted. Please trim old messages to a
> minimum when replying.
>
>
> Post message: [hidden email]
> Subscribe:  [hidden email]
> Unsubscribe:  [hidden email]
> List owner:  [hidden email]
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

gordon.smith29
Hi Sam,

If memory serves my infamous tyre repair kit is called Plug'n'Go and I got it off eBay for about £35 - that's about $50 or so. Not Cheap!
It has a great Applicator Gun for inserting the silicon rubber 'mushrooms' which seem to do a pretty good job of sealing a puncture to the Main Treaded Area of a tyre. Kit comes in wallet with Probe tool, Reamer, Blade for cutting off the excess plug tail and a bag of about 50 mushroom shaped plugs.
I find mini-compressors a bit noisy for my delicate hearing, preferring to use a foot-pump and a digital Tyre Pressure Gauge.
My experience with the CO2 cannisters has never been very good - yes they are small and light but the applicator hose is always too short and it doesn't take much to lose what gas is in there.
I've never been able to put more than 26psi into a tyre with those bottles which is nowhere near enough for safe onward progress.

Cheers
Gordon
2xBBB
Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK

--- In [hidden email], Samuel Crider <dieseldude1@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for the info. I'll have to check out the rivet gun contraption.

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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

gordon.smith29
In reply to this post by Samuel Crider
Hi Sam,

If memory serves my infamous tyre repair kit is called Plug'n'Go and I got it off eBay for about £35 - that's about $50 or so. Not Cheap!
It has a great Applicator Gun for inserting the silicon rubber 'mushrooms' which seem to do a pretty good job of sealing a puncture to the Main Treaded Area of a tyre. Kit comes in wallet with Probe tool, Reamer, Blade for cutting off the excess plug tail and a bag of about 50 mushroom shaped plugs.
I find mini-compressors a bit noisy for my delicate hearing, preferring to use a foot-pump and a digital Tyre Pressure Gauge.
My experience with the CO2 cannisters has never been very good - yes they are small and light but the applicator hose is always too short and it doesn't take much to lose what gas is in there.
I've never been able to put more than 26psi into a tyre with those bottles which is nowhere near enough for safe onward progress.

Cheers
Gordon
2xBBB
Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK

--- In [hidden email], Samuel Crider <dieseldude1@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks for the info. I'll have to check out the rivet gun contraption.

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Re: Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

Jack Byers
In reply to this post by greg95ns
Hi Greg,
   That is the same set my sister's hubby has. I watched him use it  
on an unusual front tire "pea-gravel" puncture. (A tiny rock that  
looked just line an arrow-head!) even with all the help and advise he  
had during the entire operation, installing that mushroom shaped plug  
into the tire and stopping the air leak went without a hitch. It was  
even a little too easy, almost boring, which is exactly what we like  
in such cases. The kit is much larger than you'd expect, but one  
needs very strong tools to install any style plug sometimes. I broke  
one on a big rear tire flat I had before I learned about the leather  
nail flap idea. Come to think of it, that was my last flat. Three  
motorcycles ago! That must have been 1989, that's 23 years since my  
last flat tire. I have lost count of how many nail flaps I've made  
for my bike or made for riding buddies. When I'm going to go on a  
long trip with another guy, I will sometimes get him to let me put  
one on his bike ( if there are mounting points). I've never had a  
trip interrupted by the other bike, either. When it also had a flap.  
My life long riding buddy Harry says it drives him crazy to be behind  
me, and have to watch that thing under my bike. He keeps "flashing on  
it", as he says, and he feels startled. Harry always rides in front  
anyhow, since he got his new Concours. He had to chase me on  his  
classic R100s for so many years now I'll probably have to let him  
lead from now on! Guys have asked about it sure, but it hasn't bugged  
anyone else that I know. BMW riders aren't known for their  
flexibility, or liberal ideas. Case in point, the "Ural" motorcycle.  
I still carry my can of "Flat-Fix" despite the warning on the can not  
to use on "Z" rated tires. If I get a puncture, I'll be changing that  
tyre the first chance I get. I will remove the plug, and put a patch  
on the inside of the tire ASAP. , because I've seen the damage they  
can cause to the carcass of the tire itself from excessive heat  
generated by the flexing of the carcass on the plug. Properly patched  
tires do not show any such damage, but to be on the safe side I take  
it easy as long as I continue to use a patched tire. Then I get a new  
one on there when I get home.
  Kindest regards,
    Poppa Jack
On Nov 11, 2012, at 8:36 AM, Greg wrote:

> Hi Samuel, My last repair kit didn't work so well. I'm going to buy  
> one of these.
> http://www.aerostich.com/stop-and-go-pocket-plugger-tubeless-tire- 
> repair-kit.html
> I already have an air compressor I carry with me. It has a built in  
> gauge. I stripped off the case to make it smaller.
> Greg Andrews
> '96 900 BRG
> 93,000 smiles
>
> Samuel Crider wrote:
> Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research  
> and failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a  
> product exist that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the  
> inside as well as in the puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/
> patch combination repair.
> Samuel
> 96 BBBB PB
> New Orleans
>
>

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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

adeux60
Poppa

It has also been three years since we asked for a photo of your internationally famous Nail Flap. you keep teasing us with it. Make sure you are in the picture too won't you!

A2



--- In [hidden email], Jack Byers <jackbyers@...> wrote:

>
> Hi Greg,
>    That is the same set my sister's hubby has. I watched him use it  
> on an unusual front tire "pea-gravel" puncture. (A tiny rock that  
> looked just line an arrow-head!) even with all the help and advise he  
> had during the entire operation, installing that mushroom shaped plug  
> into the tire and stopping the air leak went without a hitch. It was  
> even a little too easy, almost boring, which is exactly what we like  
> in such cases. The kit is much larger than you'd expect, but one  
> needs very strong tools to install any style plug sometimes. I broke  
> one on a big rear tire flat I had before I learned about the leather  
> nail flap idea. Come to think of it, that was my last flat. Three  
> motorcycles ago! That must have been 1989, that's 23 years since my  
> last flat tire. I have lost count of how many nail flaps I've made  
> for my bike or made for riding buddies. When I'm going to go on a  
> long trip with another guy, I will sometimes get him to let me put  
> one on his bike ( if there are mounting points). I've never had a  
> trip interrupted by the other bike, either. When it also had a flap.  
> My life long riding buddy Harry says it drives him crazy to be behind  
> me, and have to watch that thing under my bike. He keeps "flashing on  
> it", as he says, and he feels startled. Harry always rides in front  
> anyhow, since he got his new Concours. He had to chase me on  his  
> classic R100s for so many years now I'll probably have to let him  
> lead from now on! Guys have asked about it sure, but it hasn't bugged  
> anyone else that I know. BMW riders aren't known for their  
> flexibility, or liberal ideas. Case in point, the "Ural" motorcycle.  
> I still carry my can of "Flat-Fix" despite the warning on the can not  
> to use on "Z" rated tires. If I get a puncture, I'll be changing that  
> tyre the first chance I get. I will remove the plug, and put a patch  
> on the inside of the tire ASAP. , because I've seen the damage they  
> can cause to the carcass of the tire itself from excessive heat  
> generated by the flexing of the carcass on the plug. Properly patched  
> tires do not show any such damage, but to be on the safe side I take  
> it easy as long as I continue to use a patched tire. Then I get a new  
> one on there when I get home.
>   Kindest regards,
>     Poppa Jack
> On Nov 11, 2012, at 8:36 AM, Greg wrote:
>
> > Hi Samuel, My last repair kit didn't work so well. I'm going to buy  
> > one of these.
> > http://www.aerostich.com/stop-and-go-pocket-plugger-tubeless-tire- 
> > repair-kit.html
> > I already have an air compressor I carry with me. It has a built in  
> > gauge. I stripped off the case to make it smaller.
> > Greg Andrews
> > '96 900 BRG
> > 93,000 smiles
> >
> > Samuel Crider wrote:
> > Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research  
> > and failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a  
> > product exist that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the  
> > inside as well as in the puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/
> > patch combination repair.
> > Samuel
> > 96 BBBB PB
> > New Orleans
> >
> >
>


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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

gordon.smith29
I'll settle for one of the Internationally Famous Nail Flap and one of Poppa Jack at his ease (with Momma Jack would be OK too)
Gordon

--- In [hidden email], "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@...> wrote:

>
> Poppa
>
> It has also been three years since we asked for a photo of your internationally famous Nail Flap. you keep teasing us with it. Make sure you are in the picture too won't you!
>
> A2
>
>
>
> --- In [hidden email], Jack Byers <jackbyers@> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Greg,
> >    That is the same set my sister's hubby has. I watched him use it  
> > on an unusual front tire "pea-gravel" puncture. (A tiny rock that  
> > looked just line an arrow-head!) even with all the help and advise he  
> > had during the entire operation, installing that mushroom shaped plug  
> > into the tire and stopping the air leak went without a hitch. It was  
> > even a little too easy, almost boring, which is exactly what we like  
> > in such cases. The kit is much larger than you'd expect, but one  
> > needs very strong tools to install any style plug sometimes. I broke  
> > one on a big rear tire flat I had before I learned about the leather  
> > nail flap idea. Come to think of it, that was my last flat. Three  
> > motorcycles ago! That must have been 1989, that's 23 years since my  
> > last flat tire. I have lost count of how many nail flaps I've made  
> > for my bike or made for riding buddies. When I'm going to go on a  
> > long trip with another guy, I will sometimes get him to let me put  
> > one on his bike ( if there are mounting points). I've never had a  
> > trip interrupted by the other bike, either. When it also had a flap.  
> > My life long riding buddy Harry says it drives him crazy to be behind  
> > me, and have to watch that thing under my bike. He keeps "flashing on  
> > it", as he says, and he feels startled. Harry always rides in front  
> > anyhow, since he got his new Concours. He had to chase me on  his  
> > classic R100s for so many years now I'll probably have to let him  
> > lead from now on! Guys have asked about it sure, but it hasn't bugged  
> > anyone else that I know. BMW riders aren't known for their  
> > flexibility, or liberal ideas. Case in point, the "Ural" motorcycle.  
> > I still carry my can of "Flat-Fix" despite the warning on the can not  
> > to use on "Z" rated tires. If I get a puncture, I'll be changing that  
> > tyre the first chance I get. I will remove the plug, and put a patch  
> > on the inside of the tire ASAP. , because I've seen the damage they  
> > can cause to the carcass of the tire itself from excessive heat  
> > generated by the flexing of the carcass on the plug. Properly patched  
> > tires do not show any such damage, but to be on the safe side I take  
> > it easy as long as I continue to use a patched tire. Then I get a new  
> > one on there when I get home.
> >   Kindest regards,
> >     Poppa Jack
> > On Nov 11, 2012, at 8:36 AM, Greg wrote:
> >
> > > Hi Samuel, My last repair kit didn't work so well. I'm going to buy  
> > > one of these.
> > > http://www.aerostich.com/stop-and-go-pocket-plugger-tubeless-tire- 
> > > repair-kit.html
> > > I already have an air compressor I carry with me. It has a built in  
> > > gauge. I stripped off the case to make it smaller.
> > > Greg Andrews
> > > '96 900 BRG
> > > 93,000 smiles
> > >
> > > Samuel Crider wrote:
> > > Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little research  
> > > and failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a  
> > > product exist that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the  
> > > inside as well as in the puncture? Providing a higher quality plug/
> > > patch combination repair.
> > > Samuel
> > > 96 BBBB PB
> > > New Orleans
> > >
> > >
> >
>


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Re: Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

Jack Byers
Okay Gordon!
   I was thinking Greg Andrews got a picture of the "Nail Flap" when  
he visited early this year. I have a camera, I guess I'll have to  
read up on using it, and putting pics on my computer. Everybody else  
is so good about making pictures, but I'm not the most computer  
literate person in my age group. I'll get it done, I promise. I just  
have to get one of the young folks in the clan to teach me  
how......again. It's funny because I was told about the "nail flap"  
by a guy who learned about it in London, from guys he rode around  
with. All I can figure is that like so many other moto-fads, the Nail  
Flap's time came and went. The guy told me that for some reason rear  
flats by nails were a big problem in London? This must have been back  
in the mid-sixties, judging by the fellow's age, bald spot, and grey  
ponytail!
  I'll get right on the pic(s) Bro.
  Kindest regards,
    Poppa Jack

On Nov 13, 2012, at 5:18 AM, gordon2xbbb wrote:

> I'll settle for one of the Internationally Famous Nail Flap and one  
> of Poppa Jack at his ease (with Momma Jack would be OK too)
> Gordon
>
> --- In [hidden email], "a2 - inoperative emessages"  
> <adeux60@...> wrote:
> >
> > Poppa
> >
> > It has also been three years since we asked for a photo of your  
> internationally famous Nail Flap. you keep teasing us with it. Make  
> sure you are in the picture too won't you!
> >
> > A2
> >
> >
> >
> > --- In [hidden email], Jack Byers <jackbyers@> wrote:
> > >
> > > Hi Greg,
> > > That is the same set my sister's hubby has. I watched him use it
> > > on an unusual front tire "pea-gravel" puncture. (A tiny rock that
> > > looked just line an arrow-head!) even with all the help and  
> advise he
> > > had during the entire operation, installing that mushroom  
> shaped plug
> > > into the tire and stopping the air leak went without a hitch.  
> It was
> > > even a little too easy, almost boring, which is exactly what we  
> like
> > > in such cases. The kit is much larger than you'd expect, but one
> > > needs very strong tools to install any style plug sometimes. I  
> broke
> > > one on a big rear tire flat I had before I learned about the  
> leather
> > > nail flap idea. Come to think of it, that was my last flat. Three
> > > motorcycles ago! That must have been 1989, that's 23 years  
> since my
> > > last flat tire. I have lost count of how many nail flaps I've made
> > > for my bike or made for riding buddies. When I'm going to go on a
> > > long trip with another guy, I will sometimes get him to let me put
> > > one on his bike ( if there are mounting points). I've never had a
> > > trip interrupted by the other bike, either. When it also had a  
> flap.
> > > My life long riding buddy Harry says it drives him crazy to be  
> behind
> > > me, and have to watch that thing under my bike. He keeps  
> "flashing on
> > > it", as he says, and he feels startled. Harry always rides in  
> front
> > > anyhow, since he got his new Concours. He had to chase me on his
> > > classic R100s for so many years now I'll probably have to let him
> > > lead from now on! Guys have asked about it sure, but it hasn't  
> bugged
> > > anyone else that I know. BMW riders aren't known for their
> > > flexibility, or liberal ideas. Case in point, the "Ural"  
> motorcycle.
> > > I still carry my can of "Flat-Fix" despite the warning on the  
> can not
> > > to use on "Z" rated tires. If I get a puncture, I'll be  
> changing that
> > > tyre the first chance I get. I will remove the plug, and put a  
> patch
> > > on the inside of the tire ASAP. , because I've seen the damage  
> they
> > > can cause to the carcass of the tire itself from excessive heat
> > > generated by the flexing of the carcass on the plug. Properly  
> patched
> > > tires do not show any such damage, but to be on the safe side I  
> take
> > > it easy as long as I continue to use a patched tire. Then I get  
> a new
> > > one on there when I get home.
> > > Kindest regards,
> > > Poppa Jack
> > > On Nov 11, 2012, at 8:36 AM, Greg wrote:
> > >
> > > > Hi Samuel, My last repair kit didn't work so well. I'm going  
> to buy
> > > > one of these.
> > > > http://www.aerostich.com/stop-and-go-pocket-plugger-tubeless- 
> tire-
> > > > repair-kit.html
> > > > I already have an air compressor I carry with me. It has a  
> built in
> > > > gauge. I stripped off the case to make it smaller.
> > > > Greg Andrews
> > > > '96 900 BRG
> > > > 93,000 smiles
> > > >
> > > > Samuel Crider wrote:
> > > > Speaking of plug kits. What's the best one? I did a little  
> research
> > > > and failed to find what I consider a suitable product. Does a
> > > > product exist that opens similar to a umbrella and seats on the
> > > > inside as well as in the puncture? Providing a higher quality  
> plug/
> > > > patch combination repair.
> > > > Samuel
> > > > 96 BBBB PB
> > > > New Orleans
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
>
>

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Re: Spares and Tools while Traveling

gordon.smith29
Looking forward to it Jack....

Nail flaps are a bit like the thorn catchers we used to have to put on our racing bicycles when using 'Tubeless tyres'. They must have done the same job - flicking away the thorn or nail before it really become embedded in your precious tyre.

Cycling 'Tubeless Tyres' were in fact glued to the rims and were made of silk with a lightweight rubber tread applied after the inner tube was sewn into the casing. Quite expensive but a 'must' for high speed road and track work.

With the advent of clincher rims and lighter tyre construction they went the way of all things...but the thorn catcher still has a small but loyal following.

Cheers
Gordon

--- In [hidden email], Jack Byers <jackbyers@...> wrote:
>
> Okay Gordon!
>    I was thinking Greg Andrews got a picture of the "Nail Flap" when  
> he visited early this year. I have a camera, I guess I'll have to  
> read up on using it, and putting pics on my computer.