New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

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New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi folks,

The names "Des" and I am a new member to this group.

Dont laugh but after being an ex-byker for 23 years I am seriously thinking of getting back into the sport at a tender age of 59 years old.

Common sense told me to look at machines that I used to enjoy riding and machines which I understand and could fix myself when they go wrong. So... I first looked at BSA C15,s, Triumph Tiger 650's etc which I am familiar with but after seeing the "silly" money these fetch and how little motorcycle you get for your money I have decided not to be a stick-in-th-mud and look at machines at least 30 years newer.

Perhaps I should also start with a small machine but I know I will get fed-up pretty quick with a 125 or 250 class machine.

I noticed that the late 1990's Triumph Trophy second hand machines fall within my budget so the first questions I should like to ask are...

1  Are these machines any good second hand.

2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.

3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.

4 Am I to old?

Thanks for reading this.

Regards,

Des (old ex-byker, should know better)
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi Des,
 you would not be the oldest member on the group.
 
 I am 60 in July.
 
 reliability is largely in the hands of the owner.
 
 there are a number of probable points for failure...
 
 coils and crank position sensor are prime candidates.
 
 a number of our members do spannering...
 
 Last year I removed the wheels, repainted them, replaced the bearings a d seals, new discs re manufactured callipers with stainless bolts and pistons, repainted forks, new bushes and seals etc.
 
 prior to that I upgraded the headlights to HID.
 and put an LED lamp in the tail lights.
 
 Apart from that, Oils and filters, airfilter, cleaned and balanced the carbs, new gear shift rubber, new heated handlebar grips.
 
 Replacement disc pads and tyres...
 
 back calliper is a bit iffy, it's a sliding caliper that often doesn't slide, so one pad wears out faster than the other
 
 and that's about me done
 
 need to do shims soon, need to check cam chain tensioner spring
 
 
Oh, and it's tall and top heavy... most of us have dropped them at some stage...
 
 regards Joan
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
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Hi Des,  Welcome. Your just the right age, funny thing happens when you get on the gas and wind it out, you'll feel like 18 again.
 1. Are they good second hand machines? Yes providing the bikes been ridden on a regular basis. Those guys that have bought a low mileage bike that has sat for years, think, oh cool, I've got an almost new bike. Wrong, everything that is made of rubber will leak because the rubber dried out.
 2. Reliability. With good maintenance they will go a long way. My 900 is getting close to 104,000 miles and runs as good as new. My brother's '95 Trophy is the bike he chooses when going across the country. His bike has 260,000 miles, but to be honest I did replace some parts at 224,000 miles.
 3. Three or Four cylinders. They are both reliable machine. The shop doing the work is up to you. With a Haynes manual and the knowledgeable guys from this group we can get you thru most anything. The shop techs don't have much experience working on these bikes. They are used to working on bikes with fuel injection and remapping with a laptop.
 Which bike three or four cylinders? Both are fast enough to get you hauled off to jail. Of course the 900 gets better fuel mileage. If you and your passenger weigh 400 lbs. or more consider the 1200. It has goobs of torque and not much shifting is needed.
 4. You're the right age.
 5. You didn't mention this one. Find a bike with a top box. I find it is more convenient than the side bags. They are hard to find on Ebay or the dealer.
 Greg Andrews
 Apple Valley, California
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi Des
Being of similar age and in the situation of 'inheriting' a written off 900cc 2 years ago, I had some of 2013 and all of 2014 riding it. Truly a lovely bike to ride in almost all respects, the big problem for me is just how top heavy it is and the difficulty that presents at low speed. I am 5' 11" and around 12.5 stone so maybe I am not big or strong enough and, coupled with the fact that it has to be manoeuvred and man handled out of its 'garage' to get it onto and off of the highway each time, it becomes too much of an ordeal for the shorter journeys I would also like to use it for. 
They do seem to be as cheap as chips to buy with a couple on ebay recently going (or not even selling) for very little money but do try to move one around before buying, I hated having to give up using the centre stand and, now that the sprag clutch has given up on it, I am back to my old Norton Commando, only a little lighter but Oh so much easier to move around. I really think that as I get older the Trophy will become too much for me sooner that a better (lower centre of gravity) balanced bike and my biking life would be curtailed earlier if it was my only ride.
RegardsIvor


     On Sunday, 17 May 2015, 15:25, "[hidden email] [TriumphTrophy]" <[hidden email]> wrote:
   

     Hi Des, Welcome. Your just the right age, funny thing happens when you get on the gas and wind it out, you'll feel like 18 again.1. Are they good second hand machines? Yes providing the bikes been ridden on a regular basis. Those guys that have bought a low mileage bike that has sat for years, think, oh cool, I've got an almost new bike. Wrong, everything that is made of rubber will leak because the rubber dried out.2. Reliability. With good maintenance they will go a long way. My 900 is getting close to 104,000 miles and runs as good as new. My brother's '95 Trophy is the bike he chooses when going across the country. His bike has 260,000 miles, but to be honest I did replace some parts at 224,000 miles.3. Three or Four cylinders. They are both reliable machine. The shop doing the work is up to you. With a Haynes manual and the knowledgeable guys from this group we can get you thru most anything. The shop techs don&#39;t have much experience working on these bikes. They are used to working on bikes with fuel injection and remapping with a laptop.Which bike three or four cylinders? Both are fast enough to get you hauled off to jail. Of course the 900 gets better fuel mileage. If you and your passenger weigh 400 lbs. or more consider the 1200. It has goobs of torque and not much shifting is needed.4. You're the right age.5. You didn't mention this one. Find a bike with a top box. I find it is more convenient than the side bags. They are hard to find on Ebay or the dealer.Greg AndrewsApple Valley, California  #yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100 -- #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0 10px;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp hr {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp #yiv2395801100hd {color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px 0;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp #yiv2395801100ads {margin-bottom:10px;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp .yiv2395801100ad {padding:0 0;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp .yiv2395801100ad p {margin:0;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-mkp .yiv2395801100ad a {color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-sponsor #yiv2395801100ygrp-lc {font-family:Arial;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-sponsor #yiv2395801100ygrp-lc #yiv2395801100hd {margin:10px 0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}#yiv2395801100 #yiv2395801100ygrp-sponsor 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RE: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
In reply to this post by Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi Des





I’m 62 and bought my 1200 “in a hurry” after writing off my old bike a few years ago. I was due to tour Europe and had no bike and a limited amount of cash, so grabbed the 1200 when offered it.
Although the bike didn’t seem to run right, I was pleased with it and it took me 2,500 miles around France with no problems. Over the following year I sorted out the few problems (carbs, HT lead and a few other minor things) all with great help and empathy from the guys on this forum.
And I found I enjoyed doing the routine maintenance tasks, always assured help was close at hand should I need it.


As has been said the only downside really is it is top heavy.  Having said this, you quickly learn coping strategies for this.  Like always reversing into a parking slot, coming to a full stop before putting your feet down and “paddling” slowly when moving her around.


A really great bike, full of character, more power than you’d ever need and very reliable with basic maintenance.


Ian
PS she’s done 76,000 miles and since the trip mentioned has done 2 more 2000+ mile tours. We are planning to tour Spain and Portugal in July which will be over 3000 miles.





From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 17 May 2015 12:50
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [TriumphTrophy] New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.








Hi folks,


The names "Des" and I am a new member to this group.


Dont laugh but after being an ex-byker for 23 years I am seriously thinking of getting back into the sport at a tender age of 59 years old.


Common sense told me to look at machines that I used to enjoy riding and machines which I understand and could fix myself when they go wrong. So... I first looked at BSA C15,s, Triumph Tiger 650's etc which I am familiar with but after seeing the "silly" money these fetch and how little motorcycle you get for your money I have decided not to be a stick-in-th-mud and look at machines at least 30 years newer.


Perhaps I should also start with a small machine but I know I will get fed-up pretty quick with a 125 or 250 class machine.


I noticed that the late 1990's Triumph Trophy second hand machines fall within my budget so the first questions I should like to ask are...


1  Are these machines any good second hand.


2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.


3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.


4 Am I to old?


Thanks for reading this.


Regards,


Des (old ex-byker, should know better)






  _____


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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
In reply to this post by Triumph Trophy mailing list
Des


Straight out .  These bikes are heavy. Awkward to man handle in and out of
shed with bags and faring.  Can be funky if not ready for dismounting on a
surface that is not flat.


Excellent ride.  Above average dependability.  Remember these bikes are
used AND 12-16 yrs old.  Parts are obtainable. There is a users group.




1  Are these machines any good second hand.   YES


2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.  VERY GOOD IF MAINTAINED

PRIOR AND AFTER OWNERSHIP


3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner
maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every
time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.    IF YOU ARE
NOT MECHANICAL.  THEN WHAT OTHER CHOICES DO YOU HAVE?  A FRIEND?  ALTRENATE
SHOP?


4 Am I to old?  ALL DEPENDS ON YOU MENTAL ATTITUDE and PHYSICAL SHAPE.


Now some statistics.


The highest statistics for MC accidents is the 50+ group that has not
ridden in 20+ years getting back into it.  They become over confident,
bikes are bigger, faster and heavier.


Be safe


Make the right decision for you situation.


Tom


On Sun, May 17, 2015 at 7:50 AM, [hidden email]
[TriumphTrophy] <[hidden email]> wrote:


>
>
> Hi folks,
>
> The names "Des" and I am a new member to this group.
>
> Dont laugh but after being an ex-byker for 23 years I am seriously
> thinking of getting back into the sport at a tender age of 59 years old.
>
> Common sense told me to look at machines that I used to enjoy riding and
> machines which I understand and could fix myself when they go wrong. So...
> I first looked at BSA C15,s, Triumph Tiger 650's etc which I am familiar
> with but after seeing the "silly" money these fetch and how little
> motorcycle you get for your money I have decided not to be a
> stick-in-th-mud and look at machines at least 30 years newer.
>
> Perhaps I should also start with a small machine but I know I will get
> fed-up pretty quick with a 125 or 250 class machine.
>
> I noticed that the late 1990's Triumph Trophy second hand machines fall
> within my budget so the first questions I should like to ask are...
>
> 1  Are these machines any good second hand.
>
> 2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.
>
> 3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner
> maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every
> time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.
>
> 4 Am I to old?

>
> Thanks for reading this.
>
> Regards,
>
> Des (old ex-byker, should know better)
>
>






--
Tom
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
In reply to this post by Triumph Trophy mailing list
Des

Welcome back,,, your old instincts will return so be careful as you ride
for a while,  if you use the bike for work it might not be as much fun,,,
My trophy has just over 40 thousand miles on it and it's pretty easy to
service if you want to do it yourself, as Greg says, you are better off to
buy something that is used,, not dust covered with carbs that are all
lacquered up and an electrical system that has been assaulted by vermin.
Again: be careful..


On Sun, May 17, 2015 at 12:11 PM, IVOR COLLINS [hidden email]
[TriumphTrophy] <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> Hi Des
>
> Being of similar age and in the situation of 'inheriting' a written off
> 900cc 2 years ago, I had some of 2013 and all of 2014 riding it.
> Truly a lovely bike to ride in almost all respects, the big problem for me
> is just how top heavy it is and the difficulty that presents at low speed.
> I am 5' 11" and around 12.5 stone so maybe I am not big or strong enough
> and, coupled with the fact that it has to be manoeuvred and man handled out
> of its 'garage' to get it onto and off of the highway each time, it becomes
> too much of an ordeal for the shorter journeys I would also like to use it
> for.
>
> They do seem to be as cheap as chips to buy with a couple on ebay recently
> going (or not even selling) for very little money but do try to move one
> around before buying, I hated having to give up using the centre stand and,
> now that the sprag clutch has given up on it, I am back to my old Norton
> Commando, only a little lighter but Oh so much easier to move around.
> I really think that as I get older the Trophy will become too much for me
> sooner that a better (lower centre of gravity) balanced bike and my biking
> life would be curtailed earlier if it was my only ride.
>
> Regards
> Ivor
>
>
>
>   On Sunday, 17 May 2015, 15:25, "[hidden email] [TriumphTrophy]" <
> [hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
>
>  Hi Des,
> Welcome. Your just the right age, funny thing happens when you get on the
> gas and wind it out, you'll feel like 18 again.
> 1. Are they good second hand machines? Yes providing the bikes been ridden
> on a regular basis. Those guys that have bought a low mileage bike that has
> sat for years, think, oh cool, I've got an almost new bike. Wrong,
> everything that is made of rubber will leak because the rubber dried out.
> 2. Reliability. With good maintenance they will go a long way. My 900 is
> getting close to 104,000 miles and runs as good as new. My brother's '95
> Trophy is the bike he chooses when going across the country. His bike has
> 260,000 miles, but to be honest I did replace some parts at 224,000 miles.
> 3. Three or Four cylinders. They are both reliable machine. The shop doing
> the work is up to you. With a Haynes manual and the knowledgeable guys from
> this group we can get you thru most anything. The shop techs don& #39;t
> have much experience working on these bikes. They are used to working on
> bikes with fuel injection and remapping with a laptop.
> Which bike three or four cylinders? Both are fast enough to get you hauled
> off to jail. Of course the 900 gets better fuel mileage. If you and your
> passenger weigh 400 lbs. or more consider the 1200. It has goobs of torque
> and not much shifting is needed.
> 4. You're the right age.
> 5. You didn't mention this one. Find a bike with a top box. I find it is
> more convenient than the side bags. They are hard to find on Ebay or the
> dealer.
> Greg Andrews
> Apple Valley, California
>
>
>  
>



--
Steve Walker
Mid-Day on Hitkicker 99.7
Point Person for Production @
Monticello Media in Charlottesville, VA
814-243-1008 Cell
http://www.myspace.com/stevewalkeronair
http://stevewalizer.voice123.com
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi Des,

These are great machines for the bread. If your good at wrenching figure on
around $800 for parts to do a proper servicing. Which typically includes
tires, chain, sprockets, forks, battery, timing chain/spring, and an
assortment of rubber bits. Once all the bases have been covered she will
reward you with miles and miles of smiles. You've already arrived at the
right place. So dive in and enjoy the files, etc. Data on every imaginable
issue is located within.

Enjoy,
Samuel
96 BBBB PB
New Orleans
On May 18, 2015 11:34 AM, "Steve Walker [hidden email]
[TriumphTrophy]" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> Des
>
> Welcome back,,, your old instincts will return so be careful as you ride
> for a while,  if you use the bike for work it might not be as much fun,,,
> My trophy has just over 40 thousand miles on it and it's pretty easy to
> service if you want to do it yourself, as Greg says, you are better off to
> buy something that is used,, not dust covered with carbs that are all
> lacquered up and an electrical system that has been assaulted by vermin.
> Again: be careful..
>
>
> On Sun, May 17, 2015 at 12:11 PM, IVOR COLLINS [hidden email]
> [TriumphTrophy] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Hi Des
>>
>> Being of similar age and in the situation of 'inheriting' a written off
>> 900cc 2 years ago, I had some of 2013 and all of 2014 riding it.
>> Truly a lovely bike to ride in almost all respects, the big problem for
>> me is just how top heavy it is and the difficulty that presents at low
>> speed. I am 5' 11" and around 12.5 stone so maybe I am not big or strong
>> enough and, coupled with the fact that it has to be manoeuvred and man
>> handled out of its 'garage' to get it onto and off of the highway each
>> time, it becomes too much of an ordeal for the shorter journeys I would
>> also like to use it for.
>>
>> They do seem to be as cheap as chips to buy with a couple on ebay
>> recently going (or not even selling) for very little money but do try to
>> move one around before buying, I hated having to give up using the centre
>> stand and, now that the sprag clutch has given up on it, I am back to my
>> old Norton Commando, only a little lighter but Oh so much easier to move
>> around.
>> I really think that as I get older the Trophy will become too much for me
>> sooner that a better (lower centre of gravity) balanced bike and my biking
>> life would be curtailed earlier if it was my only ride.
>>
>> Regards
>> Ivor
>>
>>
>>
>>   On Sunday, 17 May 2015, 15:25, "[hidden email] [TriumphTrophy]"
>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>  Hi Des,
>> Welcome. Your just the right age, funny thing happens when you get on the
>> gas and wind it out, you'll feel like 18 again.
>> 1. Are they good second hand machines? Yes providing the bikes been
>> ridden on a regular basis. Those guys that have bought a low mileage bike
>> that has sat for years, think, oh cool, I've got an almost new bike. Wrong,
>> everything that is made of rubber will leak because the rubber dried out.
>> 2. Reliability. With good maintenance they will go a long way. My 900 is
>> getting close to 104,000 miles and runs as good as new. My brother's '95
>> Trophy is the bike he chooses when going across the country. His bike has
>> 260,000 miles, but to be honest I did replace some parts at 224,000 miles.
>> 3. Three or Four cylinders. They are both reliable machine. The shop
>> doing the work is up to you. With a Haynes manual and the knowledgeable
>> guys from this group we can get you thru most anything. The shop techs don&
>> #39;t have much experience working on these bikes. They are used to working
>> on bikes with fuel injection and remapping with a laptop.
>> Which bike three or four cylinders? Both are fast enough to get you
>> hauled off to jail. Of course the 900 gets better fuel mileage. If you and
>> your passenger weigh 400 lbs. or more consider the 1200. It has goobs of
>> torque and not much shifting is needed.
>> 4. You're the right age.
>> 5. You didn't mention this one. Find a bike with a top box. I find it is
>> more convenient than the side bags. They are hard to find on Ebay or the
>> dealer.
>> Greg Andrews
>> Apple Valley, California
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Steve Walker
> Mid-Day on Hitkicker 99.7
> Point Person for Production @
> Monticello Media in Charlottesville, VA
> 814-243-1008 Cell
> http://www.myspace.com/stevewalkeronair
> http://stevewalizer.voice123.com
>
>
>
>
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
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Hi Des,
Your questions:
1.  Are these machines any good second hand.My enthusiastic answer to this question is YES.  Now, that's said with a caveat.  If you get one that's been ridden hard and put up wet, then it may have some things that need fixing.  Worse, if you get one that's not been ridden at all, then you might have quite a few rubber components that need to be replaced.  None of these are particularly difficult if you have the tools and space to do the work.Check out the inspection for purchase section on our wiki at: Inspection (for purchase)
|   |
|   |   |   |   |   |
| Inspection (for purchase)These are great bikes, and they're not at all expensive to buy when compared to other sport-touring bikes on the market. If you get one in good condition, you should be able to sell it for what you bought it for, and you shouldn't need to immediately put a bunch of cash into negle... |
|  |
| View on triumph-trophy.wikia.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


2. What should I expect in terms of reliability?One of our members is pushing 200K miles on his bike.  Just like any high-performance machine, there are maintenance areas that need to be performed on-schedule.  If you do so, you can expect the bike to treat you very well. If you suspect that the previous owner might not have kept up with maintenance, then you might want to take preventative action.  
3. Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.   The only cable is the throttle cable.  It's easy to replace with the tank off.  Nothing on these bikes is particularly complicated.  They are extremely suitable for owner-maintenance and repair, assuming that you have the location and tools.  The most difficult job that I've done so far is the valve check, and it really wasn't very difficult, just time-consuming.  Rebuilding forks isn't hard.  Oil changes aren't difficult.  Changing tires isn't hard.  Keeping the chain and sprockets in good condition is a regular task unless you have an automatic oiler, but it's not difficult.  Washing the bike is easy and is a recommended way to identify things that need attention.  Use ethanol-free gasoline if it is available.
4. Am I too old?To answer that is to know whether you are in good enough condition to ride a motorcycle.  I'll leave that up to you.  These bikes are a bit top-heavy at a stop, but they're easy to ride at any speed that doesn't require clutch modulation.
Dave
 
      From: "[hidden email] [TriumphTrophy]" <[hidden email]>
 To: [hidden email]
 Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2015 7:50 AM
 Subject: [TriumphTrophy] New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.
   
    Hi folks,

The names "Des" and I am a new member to this group.

Dont laugh but after being an ex-byker for 23 years I am seriously thinking of getting back into the sport at a tender age of 59 years old.

Common sense told me to look at machines that I used to enjoy riding and machines which I understand and could fix myself when they go wrong. So... I first looked at BSA C15,s, Triumph Tiger 650's etc which I am familiar with but after seeing the "silly" money these fetch and how little motorcycle you get for your money I have decided not to be a stick-in-th-mud and look at machines at least 30 years newer.

Perhaps I should also start with a small machine but I know I will get fed-up pretty quick with a 125 or 250 class machine.

I noticed that the late 1990's Triumph Trophy second hand machines fall within my budget so the first questions I should like to ask are...

1  Are these machines any good second hand.

2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.

3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.

4 Am I to old?

Thanks for reading this.

Regards,

Des (old ex-byker, should know better)  #yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059 -- #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0 10px;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp hr {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp #yiv0697056059hd {color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px 0;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp #yiv0697056059ads {margin-bottom:10px;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp .yiv0697056059ad {padding:0 0;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp .yiv0697056059ad p {margin:0;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-mkp .yiv0697056059ad a {color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-sponsor #yiv0697056059ygrp-lc {font-family:Arial;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-sponsor #yiv0697056059ygrp-lc #yiv0697056059hd {margin:10px 0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}#yiv0697056059 #yiv0697056059ygrp-sponsor #yiv0697056059ygrp-lc .yiv0697056059ad 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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi again,

My thanks to Rebullet, greg95ns, Ivor Collins, Steve Walker, Samuel Crider and David Webb for taking the time to respond to my recent posting.

I should explain I am located in the UK so if I use any strange terms in the future such as "gear change" then I of course mean "shift" so please excuse me :-)

While this group is not exactly local in terms of geography I choose it after reading some of the posts and it quickly became clear that this group has the best "focus" and group wisdom with respect to the Triumph Trophy.

From the responses received so far I can see I am in good company and reading your comments has not only answered my questions in full but also given me some good insight into these machines when purchased second hand.

Far from being "put off" I am now even more enthusiastic about these machines having been informed they are good for user servicing and generally have a very l-o-n-g life if given regular maintenance.

One point which seems to have been echoed a number of times is that these machines are "top heavy" so I will have to make a point of wheeling one around just to make sure I can handle the weight. The last medium/heavy machine I owned was a 1972 Triumph Tiger 650 back in the 1990's.

I followed Samual's and Dave's advice and dived into the files section, a mine of information. The "inspection for purchase" wiki entry will be very helpful when its time to buy a machine.

Thanks again for making me feel welcome.

Regards,

Des (pending biker)
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
The picture at the top of the front page was taken in Derby. Thats only a small sample of British owners. :-)

To: [hidden email]
From: [hidden email]
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 07:06:31 -0700
Subject: [TriumphTrophy] Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.














 

 



 


   
     
     
      Hi again,

My thanks to Rebullet, greg95ns, Ivor Collins, Steve Walker, Samuel Crider and David Webb for taking the time to respond to my recent posting.

I should explain I am located in the UK so if I use any strange terms in the future such as "gear change" then I of course mean "shift" so please excuse me :-)

While this group is not exactly local in terms of geography I choose it after reading some of the posts and it quickly became clear that this group has the best "focus" and group wisdom with respect to the Triumph Trophy.

From the responses received so far I can see I am in good company and reading your comments has not only answered my questions in full but also given me some good insight into these machines when purchased second hand.

Far from being "put off" I am now even more enthusiastic about these machines having been informed they are good for user servicing and generally have a very l-o-n-g life if given regular maintenance.

One point which seems to have been echoed a number of times is that these machines are "top heavy" so I will have to make a point of wheeling one around just to make sure I can handle the weight. The last medium/heavy machine I owned was a 1972 Triumph Tiger 650 back in the 1990's.

I followed Samual's and Dave's advice and dived into the files section, a mine of information. The "inspection for purchase" wiki entry will be very helpful when its time to buy a machine.

Thanks again for making me feel welcome.

Regards,

Des (pending biker)


   
     

   
   






 






     
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RE: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
In reply to this post by Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi Ian, Tom and the group,

Thanks to Ian and Tom for the recent responses to my posting. I found Ian's comments about the reliability of second hand machines very encouraging.

Ian wrote:
1 Are these machines any good second hand. YES
2 What should I expect in terms of reliability. VERY GOOD IF MAINTAINED
PRIOR AND AFTER OWNERSHIP
*** end quote ***

One comment which seems to keep cropping-up is that the machines are "top heavy" and frankly this is beggining to concern me a little. In addition Toms comments sent a "shiver" down my spine...

Tom wrote:
The highest statistics for MC accidents is the 50+ group that has not
ridden in 20+ years getting back into it. They become over confident...
*** end quote ***

Wow! Thats description fits me perfectly! Hmmm, might need to think about this some more :-) OTOH I have very nearly come to grief a number of times walking the dog, crossing the road when some **** on a mobile phone (cell phone) not looking where they are going has driven straight over the pedestrian crossing. Lifes full of risk.

Another point Tom raised in response to my original question about home servicing when I asked "are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every
time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change"...

Tom wrote:
IF YOU ARE NOT MECHANICAL. THEN WHAT OTHER CHOICES DO YOU HAVE? A FRIEND? ALTRENATE SHOP?
*** end quote ***

I see now that my original question was perhaps unclear. Though I am mechanical and have re-built complete motor cycle engines in the past I am also all to aware that on modern machines even the simple jobs like changing a spark-plug or fitting new clutch plates can become a nightmare because of the need for custom or specialised tools. Things like oiling the chain or adjusting chain tension are probably still easy enough but I was wondering how practical it would be to replace (for example) the dreaded sprag-clutch which seems to be a common failing of the starter mechanism. So perhaps my question should have read...

With previous mechanical experience of motor cycle engine re-builds and a sound mechanical knowledge how practical is it to do an engine strip-down and re-build of a Triumph Trophy engine at-home or is this so specialised that only specialy trained personnel can attempt such a task should it ever become an issue?

My fear (aisde from dropping the machine) is that I might buy a machine and then be unlucky enough to need (for example) a new sprag-clutch mechanism fitting at some point in the future and wondered how practical it might be to attempt such as job myself.

Anyway, many thanks for the addition input, its proving very helpful in helping me decide.

Best wishes,

Des.
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RE: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
In reply to this post by Triumph Trophy mailing list

   
The death to Sprag Clutches is largly preventable. DO NOT EVER TRY TO START USING A WEAK OR COMPROMIZED BATTERY. 
These bikes must have a fresh and fully charged battery. And squeaky clean electrical connections, terminationd and Grounds (earths).  They are much more sensitive to diminished reserve battery capacity than all other brands.  Just because a battery can spin the motor over, doesn't mean it has the extra capacity to fire the ignition system and atart the engine.
Bob Clark01 Sunset Red Trophy 120096 BRG Thunderbird 900Jacksonville, FL


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "[hidden email] [TriumphTrophy]" <[hidden email]>
Date: 05/30/2015  6:01 AM  (GMT-05:00)
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [TriumphTrophy] New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.


 



 


   
     
     
      Hi Ian, Tom and the group,

Thanks to Ian and Tom for the recent responses to my posting. I found Ian's comments about the reliability of second hand machines very encouraging.

Ian wrote:
1 Are these machines any good second hand. YES
2 What should I expect in terms of reliability. VERY GOOD IF MAINTAINED
PRIOR AND AFTER OWNERSHIP
*** end quote ***

One comment which seems to keep cropping-up is that the machines are "top heavy" and frankly this is beggining to concern me a little. In addition Toms comments sent a "shiver" down my spine...

Tom wrote:
The highest statistics for MC accidents is the 50+ group that has not
ridden in 20+ years getting back into it. They become over confident...
*** end quote ***

Wow! Thats description fits me perfectly! Hmmm, might need to think about this some more :-) OTOH I have very nearly come to grief a number of times walking the dog, crossing the road when some **** on a mobile phone (cell phone) not looking where they are going has driven straight over the pedestrian crossing. Lifes full of risk.

Another point Tom raised in response to my original question about home servicing when I asked "are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every
time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change"...

Tom wrote:
IF YOU ARE NOT MECHANICAL. THEN WHAT OTHER CHOICES DO YOU HAVE? A FRIEND? ALTRENATE SHOP?
*** end quote ***

I see now that my original question was perhaps unclear. Though I am mechanical and have re-built complete motor cycle engines in the past I am also all to aware that on modern machines even the simple jobs like changing a spark-plug or fitting new clutch plates can become a nightmare because of the need for custom or specialised tools. Things like oiling the chain or adjusting chain tension are probably still easy enough but I was wondering how practical it would be to replace (for example) the dreaded sprag-clutch which seems to be a common failing of the starter mechanism. So perhaps my question should have read...

With previous mechanical experience of motor cycle engine re-builds and a sound mechanical knowledge how practical is it to do an engine strip-down and re-build of a Triumph Trophy engine at-home or is this so specialised that only specialy trained personnel can attempt such a task should it ever become an issue?

My fear (aisde from dropping the machine) is that I might buy a machine and then be unlucky enough to need (for example) a new sprag-clutch mechanism fitting at some point in the future and wondered how practical it might be to attempt such as job myself.

Anyway, many thanks for the addition input, its proving very helpful in helping me decide.

Best wishes,

Des.

   
     

   
   


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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
In reply to this post by Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hey Des!
  I'm glad to hear that you are going to rejoin the magnificent obsession of motorcycling. Right now is a great time to pick up a 1991 or newer Trophy. You'll hear that they are somewhat top heavy, but by following a couple simple rules (that will become good habits with a little time), mainly in parking it, you won't have any troubles. Trophys are known to have a few minor teething problems, that we have had to do a few simple mods to our bikes that take care of any of them. We have a lot of suggestions in our "Facts files", that together with a good manuel will make these bikes real performers. To quote one of our more knowledgeable members (Greg Andrews), "I'd rather have a Trophy with a goodly number of miles on the clock, as the very worst thing one can do to one of these "Beasties", is not ride it on a regular basis. Greg and his brother Kurt both have Triumphs that have well over 100k miles on them. I think Kurt's has over 200K on his bike! I've found the one I own (bought new in 1995 Stateside) is a 1200/4. The 3 cyl models are most common, and are almost as fast and powerful as the 4 banger (BBBB vs. BBBs). I have found that my bike has been easy to maintain, mostly. These bikes are very different from those bikes of old. They are automotive like dependability. I like the wail of the triple. It is truly musical, and still very nearly as fast as the four cyl. model. The good news is, on most of this series (MK1 & MK2) bikes have already had all the necessary mods done. Are you too old? You tell me? I'm 67, and there are several members in their 70's, and hail from both sexes, and all different sizes and lifestyles. You didn't mention where you are, but here in the States, they are so rare, that they always draw a crowd. We are always looking for Trophys for sale, and reporting back to the group. Many of us own two or more of these bikes. I think it is much like riding a bicycle, in that your body will remember most of the necessary skills. You'd be wise to take a "Riders Course". Some outfits aim a program specifically at returning riders. It would be a good idea for you to go riding with friends, where you follow them, taking great care to watch their "Lines" thru traffic, and curves. Stay off big freeways as much as you can for the first year. Those little two lane twisty roads are the most fun anyhow. The power difference between these modern bikes and those "Vintage" Brit bikes we old fellows rode back in the day. Now-a-days, everything will do "The Ton" (100mph), both models will do a lot more than 100 mph. Stopping is a whole new world with the dual front disc brakes. These cause most "tip-overs" we've all done. The trick is, don't try to do anything "fancy" under about 5-7 mph. Think about keeping the forks as straight ahead as possible, when parking. I can see a few small advantages to starting out on a smaller machine, but Trophys are pretty light for a full size sport tourer. It just carries weight high until you get above 10-15 mph, then the weight just disappears. I took mine to a company in Corona, CA. a few years back, and had my frontend tricked out. I didn't like the way the nose would dive on hard breaking. The bike felt like it was on a rail thru twisties, when it was stock, but it's amazing thru the twists and turns, and better when parking, especially two up. When Mr. Bloore got the company back up, he made the bikes in a "Modular" concept. That means that the various different models available back then were basically all the same running gear, thus most parts those years were interchangeable. The 6.6 gallon gas tank on these account for a good deal of the top-heavy challenge. From 1996 on, the Trophy had color matched saddlebags, and optional top box. Keep a check on the "Group" messages as we will announce any bikes for sale we come across. I've had mine for 20 years now, and I've done all of those necessary mods. In all of those 20 years, I've yet to see another motorcycle I thought was more beautiful, or desirable than my 1995. I put a nice set of GIVI bags on it, and I never bother to take them off. If I do tip over, those bags keep my mufflers from getting scratched up. I can buy a new lid for less than $100.00. New OEM mufflers, "Priceless!" The '96 models up (MK-II), have bigger fairing, thus better protection from the elements. The '91-'95 models were the biggest sport bikes back then, and Triumph didn't make a bike with bags yet. I like the single light (MK-I) looks, and the stock (read low) windshield, and found it to provide enough coverage to suffice. Good luck on your search. I think my bike looks like two wheeled "Jaguar". The bike's lines aren't angular like those "Big four" motor companies. They are flowing and curvy. Keep in touch, and let us know if you have any kind of questions we might help with. We generally will respond the same day, because most of us are older than you, and retired. So, where are you?
 Kindest regards,
   Poppa Jack
On May 18, 2015, at 7:52 AM, Tom Halchuk [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy] wrote:

>
> Des
>
> Straight out .  These bikes are heavy. Awkward to man handle in and out of shed with bags and faring.  Can be funky if not ready for dismounting on a surface that is not flat.
>
> Excellent ride.  Above average dependability.  Remember these bikes are used AND 12-16 yrs old.  Parts are obtainable. There is a users group.  
>
>
> 1  Are these machines any good second hand.   YES
>
> 2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.  VERY GOOD IF MAINTAINED PRIOR AND AFTER OWNERSHIP
>
> 3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.    IF YOU ARE NOT MECHANICAL.  THEN WHAT OTHER CHOICES DO YOU HAVE?  A FRIEND?  ALTRENATE SHOP?
>
> 4 Am I to old?  ALL DEPENDS ON YOU MENTAL ATTITUDE and PHYSICAL SHAPE.
>
> Now some statistics.
>
> The highest statistics for MC accidents is the 50+ group that has not ridden in 20+ years getting back into it.  They become over confident, bikes are bigger, faster and heavier.
>
> Be safe
>
> Make the right decision for you situation.
>
> Tom
>
> On Sun, May 17, 2015 at 7:50 AM, [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  
> Hi folks,
>
> The names "Des" and I am a new member to this group.
>
> Dont laugh but after being an ex-byker for 23 years I am seriously thinking of getting back into the sport at a tender age of 59 years old.
>
> Common sense told me to look at machines that I used to enjoy riding and machines which I understand and could fix myself when they go wrong. So... I first looked at BSA C15,s, Triumph Tiger 650's etc which I am familiar with but after seeing the "silly" money these fetch and how little motorcycle you get for your money I have decided not to be a stick-in-th-mud and look at machines at least 30 years newer.
>
> Perhaps I should also start with a small machine but I know I will get fed-up pretty quick with a 125 or 250 class machine.
>
> I noticed that the late 1990's Triumph Trophy second hand machines fall within my budget so the first questions I should like to ask are...
>
> 1  Are these machines any good second hand.
>
> 2 What should I expect in terms of reliability.
>
> 3 Though they have 3 or 4 cyclinders are they still suited to owner maintenance or would I expect to be taking the machine to a dealer every time I have a mis-fire, break a cable or need an oil change.
>
> 4 Am I to old?
>
> Thanks for reading this.
>
> Regards,
>
> Des (old ex-byker, should know better)
>
>
>
>
> --
> Tom
>
>

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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi poppa Jack,

Many thanks for your comprehensive low-down on the Trophy machines.

You certainly paint a much more optimistic picture regarding the "top heavy" issue with these machines and it sounds very much like this is something thats really only a major issue at very low speeds and when parking or trying to get the thing in and out of the garage.

I found your comments and cautions regarding the use of the twin disc brakes at low speed of particular interest. I have never ridden a motorcycle with twin disks before so I will keep your comments in-mind.

I was so pleased you mentioned the BBB and BBBB terms, I had seen thes in other postings but until I read your message I had no idea what the terms made reference to.

poppa Jack wrote:
Are you too old? You tell me? I'm 67, and there are several members in their 70's, and hail from both sexes, and all different sizes and lifestyles.
*** end quote ***

Perhaps at 58 I am not to old after all. I agree I will need to take it s-l-o-w for the first year or so and as for freeways (motorways over here) thats something I plan to avoid as much as possible. I am not a big fan of motorways at the best of times and much prefer a quiet country road.

Thanks again for the tips and I will keep yourself and the group posted as to my progress. Currently I am still on-target for spring of next year though I may purchase a machine before if one becomes available.

Kind regards,

Des.
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RE: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

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Hi and thanks for the follow-up on my sprag-clutch comment.

*** Quote ***
These bikes must have a fresh and fully charged battery. And squeaky clean electrical connections, terminationd and Grounds (earths).
*** end quote ***

Thanks for the tips, perhaps the safest thing to do with a second hand machine is to verify the battery condition early-on and replace if needed. Electrical maintenance and repair is less of a problem here as thats pretty much what I do anyway so I will keep your comments in mind.

Its good to know that the sprag-clutch failure is not so much of a definite outcome so long as everything is correctly maintained.

Kind regards,

Des.
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

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Hi Des,

 The "top heavy" issue is significantly reducing by not filling the gas tank to the very top. If just traveling shorter distances locally you may want to keep the tank under 3/4 full. I think the area to be most careful is going around "roundabouts" (are they called roundabouts over there?)
 

 Jim
 99 BBB
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

Triumph Trophy mailing list
Hi Des - I've watched the commentary on this and am now forced to add my own view.

I fall into the 'new to biking' group, starting at the tender age of 53 with no prior riding experience. I did a one week course and rode a Honda 500 for a short while. I decided early on that the Trphy was the bike I wanted and snapped one up really cheap on ebay that just needed - yep, you guessed - a new sprag clutch. At that stage I didn't even know what a sprag clutch was!! Muppet.

While I have worked on cars (yep - UK based) since my teens, I had no experience working on bikes. I found the process of replacing the sprag VERY straightfoward with a reasonable set of standard tools - and the help of the guys on here of course!! Mine is the later type without the access panel so it was engine out, split the cases, etc. It gave me a great chance to get to know the beast in great detail - thats my defence for not doing the research before I pressed the 'Bid Now' button.

I now have the '98 Trophy and a '98 Sprint Exec (same bike, less fairing) and yes, they are a little top heavy but once you lay it on its side the first time you know where the point of no return is. Get your hands on one and see how it feels. I'm sure one of the members here could be persuaded - I'm in rural Hampshire if that's any help - although I'm currently fighting to remove the last 2 rear disc retaining bolts from the wheel - loctited beyond all reason and refusing to budge!!

Just my 2 cents worth - hope it helps. Happy hunting.

Philip
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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

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Hello again!
 Running around with half a tank really is a good idea especially in town, where maneuverability is a paramount issue. Most of my riding is long trips. I love being "on the road", with nothing ruling in my life, but which way to go. Momma Jack calls it "wandering". I like to just follow my nose. I used to be an avid "mountaineer", and backpacker. I'm too old and fat to really tackle the country I used to love so very much. The good news is, all of that expensive ultra-lite-weight gear I toted around in a backpack, packed up quite nicely. I learned how to cook with my kit very well. I have surprised my travel-mates with some dishes one would never imagine having on a long hike. Such as pineapple Upside Down cake, after a sumptuous "Jembolia", or perfect "rib-eye" steaks with baked potatoes, corn on the cob, and fresh salad. During a week long trip with two of my favorite riding partners, one shook his head, and said, "Poppa, you should write a book about how you do this stuff." I just would stop at some little "Mom & Pop" store, and come up with something really good for dinner. It was to be my last ride with "Crazy Dave" (a well earned moniker, trust me!). He passed away during his lunch break, and people just thought he was snoozing, and left him alone. One last piece of advise in regard to these bikes perhaps due to the fact that they were a very high performance "Sport Bike". After exhaustive study, and countless "Lab" as well as "Real-World", conditions came to one inescapable conclusion, and that ultimately experiment after experiment, and trial after trial, in some of the harshest conditions on the continent, and that was, "No matter what Bob says, British Racing green is by far the fastest color, in the visible light spectrum, all the way. We were actually stunned after listening to Bob's tale of red being so fast, for so long. I for one am very happy with the results, but in truth it came as no surprise to the scientific community. Happy hunting for your next "New" bike!
 Kindest regards,
   Poppa Jack
On May 30, 2015, at 12:35 PM, [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy] wrote:

> Hi Des,
>
>
> The "top heavy" issue is significantly reducing by not filling the gas tank to the very top. If just traveling shorter distances locally you may want to keep the tank under 3/4 full. I think the area to be most careful is going around "roundabouts" (are they called roundabouts over there?)
>
> Jim
> 99 BBB
>
>

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Re: New to group and possibly returning to motorcycling.

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I don't know about else where, but in the US Southwest, they are called "Traffic Circles". An ingenious idea for keeping that traffic rolling. I wish we had them everywhere!
  Poppa
On May 30, 2015, at 12:35 PM, [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy] wrote:

> Hi Des,
>
>
> The "top heavy" issue is significantly reducing by not filling the gas tank to the very top. If just traveling shorter distances locally you may want to keep the tank under 3/4 full. I think the area to be most careful is going around "roundabouts" (are they called roundabouts over there?)
>
> Jim
> 99 BBB
>
>

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