Headlight relay help requested

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Headlight relay help requested

gandrews2
Hi All, I need to buy a high beam headlight relay. I think the relay also powers the tail light. Not sure of the Hella number. I looked in the search but couldn't come up with a number. Anybody have the number handy? Here is the rest of the story.
 The $250 '98 900 Trophy I bought in New Mexico is now running. I thought it would be a case of replacing the alternator rubbers, and a coil, and other minor things. How wrong could I be. Things I had to replace.
 Engine cases, oil pan, crankshaft, cylinder liner, piston and rod, main crankshaft bearings and rod bearings. Then there is the assorted gaskets, repair the side fairings and repaint them. The total cost is somewhere north of $650. It now runs smoothly, so progress is being made.
 Thanks,
 Greg Andrews
 


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Re: Headlight relay help requested

gordon.smith29
Hi Greg, Just dug out my Spare Headlights for a MkII (that correct for you ?)
 There are two Relays, both the same, HELLA, 4RA 003 510-08, 12v, 30A
 Four connections numbered 30 & 87, 85 & 86.
 

 Thanks for the prompt - my Spares are all corroded...
 

 Hope this helps
 

 Cheers
 Gordon 2xBBB, 1xTiger800
 Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK
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Re: Headlight relay help requested

Kevin Dix
On the same note, I after removing my nacelle, found the high beam relay to
be a five post model and I have to find one to replace it.  It isn't listed
on Bike Bandit that I can find.  KW Dix

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Re: RE: [TriumphTrophy] Re: Headlight relay help requested

rod999_5@yahoo.co.uk
You should be able to match it at most motor factors.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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Re: Headlight relay help requested

nort75mk3
In reply to this post by gandrews2
you can buy the relay at any automotive parts source ...probably same as a  
headlight or horn relay.
 
 
...Tim
 
 
In a message dated 3/28/2014 10:46:38 A.M. Central Daylight Time,  
[hidden email] writes:

 
 
 
Hi Greg,  
Just dug out my Spare Headlights for a MkII (that correct for you  ?)
There are two Relays, both the same, HELLA, 4RA 003 510-08, 12v,  30A
Four connections numbered 30 & 87, 85 & 86.


Thanks for the prompt - my Spares are all corroded...


Hope this helps


Cheers
Gordon 2xBBB, 1xTiger800
Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK



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Re: Headlight relay help requested

Samuel Crider
In reply to this post by gandrews2
Hey Greg,

Congratulations on a job well done! That's a pretty major job. I seem to
remember past post of standard auto shop relays working. Except they had a
different pinout. You might be able to juggle around the wires in the
socket. Which would be better than cutting and splicing.

Best wishes,

Samuel
On Mar 28, 2014 10:06 AM, <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> Hi All, I need to buy a high beam headlight relay. I think the relay also
> powers the tail light. Not sure of the Hella number. I looked in the search
> but couldn't come up with a number. Anybody have the number handy?
> Here is the rest of the story.
> The $250 '98 900 Trophy I bought in New Mexico is now running. I thought
> it would be a case of replacing the alternator rubbers, and a coil, and
> other minor things.
> How wrong could I be. Things I had to replace.
> Engine cases, oil pan, crankshaft, cylinder liner, piston and rod, main
> crankshaft bearings and rod bearings. Then there is the assorted gaskets,
> repair the side fairings and repaint them. The total cost is somewhere
> north of $650. It now runs smoothly, so progress is being made.
> Thanks,
> Greg Andrews
>
>
>
>
>
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Re: Headlight relay help requested

gandrews2
Hi Guys, Thanks for the replies. I took Gordan's number to Auto Zone and O'Reilly's auto parts. Neither one had even that number listed in their data base. They would put in the number and all it would spit back was no "search number found." I know it is a good number because it is the same relay I used on the Johnson Jolt. Auto Zone had a generic relay that looks similar on the little diagram, except it is a 40 amp relay instead of 30 amp. I will try it but I don't want to leave it in there.
 Have you got any non Hella numbers I can give to the dumb auto parts stores?
 By the way, what is with all the female workers in the auto parts stores. It used to be all guys.
 Greg
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Re: Headlight relay help requested

Don Varnau
In reply to this post by Samuel Crider
I haven't done this. I just saved the post, thinking that it might be useful
someday.

John of Jax posted this on Aug 6, 2003.

- - - - - - -

[begin quoted]

Anyways, for those of you, like me, who don't like getting gouged for parts
and are a bit mechanically inclined, here are instructions on relay
replacement for a fraction of the costs.

Note: These instructions are for '96 and up models.
The complete procedure took me about 20 min.

1. Trot down to your local Radio Shack Electronics store and pick up a
standard "30 Amp Auto Relay," Part# 275-226, cost $4.79. It even has the
same small mounting tab. Probably cheaper at an auto parts store.

2.  Remove the left fairing (you can probably do this by just removing the
chin fairing, but that would be sorta like wipin' your ass by reaching over
your left shoulder....it could be done done, but damn) and remove the screw
holding the three relays onto the frame. The relays are located on the left
hand side of the left headlight covering. The two smaller ones are the high
beam and low beam relays. The larger one with four wires in a  five pin
connector is the Load Relief Relay. Determine which relay is bad by swapping
connectors on the high and low beam relays..

3. Take old bad relay and toss in trash.

Now, a little work is involved. Triumph, apparently to ensure that people
would have to buy their expensive relays instead of just standard auto
relays, installed standard auto relays, except the internal wiring is
switched around. However, not a problem. Here is what you do:

4. Look at the disconnected the plug. If it has a red and yellow wire, it is
the high beam relay. If it has a black and white wire, it is the low beam
relay. Either way, the instructions are pretty much the same.

5. Remove the fuse for the headlights.

6. When looking directly at the open end of the plug, opposite the wires,
you will see that each plug has a very small square openig beside each pin
opening. By pushing in a small object ( I used a very small Allen wrench
because it was the first thing to come to hand) you can release the
retaining mechanism that holds the pin in and the pin pulls right out the
back. The retaining mechanism is simply a small sliver of the pin that
sticks out and catches on a ridge to prevent the pin coming out. When you
get the first pin out and look at it, it will be obvious how this works. Do
this to each of the other pins.

7. Now then look at the back of your new relay where the pins are. You will
find each pin numbered 85, 86, 87 and 30 (don't ask me). Take the plug you
just removed the wires from and match it up to the relay connector so that
you know which pin on the plug matches to which numbered pin on the relay.
The numbers are stamped on the back of the relay. There is also a schematic
of the relay on the back of the box.

8. Now 'den. Snap the black wire connector into 85. Snap the brown and green
wire connector into 87. For the low beam: snap the black and white wire into
30 and the red and blue wire into 86. For the high beam: snap the red and
yellow wire into 30 and the white and blue wire into 86. Do a little tug on
each wire to ensure the retaining tang has snapped over the ridge and is
keeping the pin in. If it comes out, make sure the tang is sticking out a
little bit from the body of the pin and push back in.

9. Attach the connector to the relay, replace the fuse and test the lights.
They should work fine now. If not, review the connections one more time. If
not email me off line and I'll try to help.

10. Reattach the relays to the frame, reinstall the bodywork.

Optional, but recommended:

11. Ride Trophy down to Radio Shack and pick up second relay.

12. Perform entire procedure for second relay so as to have a matched set,
making it much simpler for future replacement. You now have relays that are
available nation-wide at almost any store you go in to: from the auto store
to the automotive section of your grocery store.

13. Mark with indelible marker somewhere near the relays: New relay part
number (I used a tag attached to the wiring harness with the part number and
changed wiring). Also, if you have a Haynes manual, make a notation on page
9.25 with the correct pin wiring sequence.

Hope this helps.

John of Jax 2002 1200SSC

[end quoted]

Don
'97 900


----- Original Message -----
From: Samuel Crider
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 1:03 PM
Subject: Re: [TriumphTrophy] Headlight relay help requested


Congratulations on a job well done! That's a pretty major job. I seem to
remember past post of standard auto shop relays working. Except they had a
different pinout. You might be able to juggle around the wires in the
socket. Which would be better than cutting and splicing.

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Re: Headlight relay help requested

djacarr@sky.com
If you buy 2 relays at step 1, you can omit step 11 :)



On Friday, 28 March 2014, 20:24, Don Varnau <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
 
I haven't done this. I just saved the post, thinking that it might be useful
someday.

John of Jax posted this on Aug 6, 2003.

- - - - - - -

[begin quoted]

Anyways, for those of you, like me, who don't like getting gouged for parts
and are a bit mechanically inclined, here are instructions on relay
replacement for a fraction of the costs.

Note: These instructions are for '96 and up models.
The complete procedure took me about 20 min.

1. Trot down to your local Radio Shack Electronics store and pick up a
standard "30 Amp Auto Relay," Part# 275-226, cost $4.79. It even has the
same small mounting tab. Probably cheaper at an auto parts store.

2.  Remove the left fairing (you can probably do this by just removing the
chin fairing, but that would be sorta like wipin' your ass by reaching over
your left shoulder....it could be done done, but damn) and remove the screw
holding the three relays onto the frame. The relays are located on the left
hand side of the left headlight covering. The two smaller ones are the high
beam and low beam relays. The larger one with four wires in a  five pin
connector is the Load Relief Relay. Determine which relay is bad by swapping
connectors on the high and low beam relays..

3. Take old bad relay and toss in trash.

Now, a little work is involved. Triumph, apparently to ensure that people
would have to buy their expensive relays instead of just standard auto
relays, installed standard auto relays, except the internal wiring is
switched around. However, not a problem. Here is what you do:

4. Look at the disconnected the plug. If it has a red and yellow wire, it is
the high beam relay. If it has a black and white wire, it is the low beam
relay. Either way, the instructions are pretty much the same.

5. Remove the fuse for the headlights.

6. When looking directly at the open end of the plug, opposite the wires,
you will see that each plug has a very small square openig beside each pin
opening. By pushing in a small object ( I used a very small Allen wrench
because it was the first thing to come to hand) you can release the
retaining mechanism that holds the pin in and the pin pulls right out the
back. The retaining mechanism is simply a small sliver of the pin that
sticks out and catches on a ridge to prevent the pin coming out. When you
get the first pin out and look at it, it will be obvious how this works. Do
this to each of the other pins.

7. Now then look at the back of your new relay where the pins are. You will
find each pin numbered 85, 86, 87 and 30 (don't ask me). Take the plug you
just removed the wires from and match it up to the relay connector so that
you know which pin on the plug matches to which numbered pin on the relay.
The numbers are stamped on the back of the relay. There is also a schematic
of the relay on the back of the box.

8. Now 'den. Snap the black wire connector into 85. Snap the brown and green
wire connector into 87. For the low beam: snap the black and white wire into
30 and the red and blue wire into 86. For the high beam: snap the red and
yellow wire into 30 and the white and blue wire into 86. Do a little tug on
each wire to ensure the retaining tang has snapped over the ridge and is
keeping the pin in. If it comes out, make sure the tang is sticking out a
little bit from the body of the pin and push back in.

9. Attach the connector to the relay, replace the fuse and test the lights.
They should work fine now. If not, review the connections one more time. If
not email me off line and I'll try to help.

10. Reattach the relays to the frame, reinstall the bodywork.

Optional, but recommended:

11. Ride Trophy down to Radio Shack and pick up second relay.

12. Perform entire procedure for second relay so as to have a matched set,
making it much simpler for future replacement. You now have relays that are
available nation-wide at almost any store you go in to: from the auto store
to the automotive section of your grocery store.

13. Mark with indelible marker somewhere near the relays: New relay part
number (I used a tag attached to the wiring harness with the part number and
changed wiring). Also, if you have a Haynes manual, make a notation on page
9.25 with the correct pin wiring sequence.

Hope this helps.

John of Jax 2002 1200SSC

[end quoted]

Don
'97 900

----- Original Message -----
From: Samuel Crider
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2014 1:03 PM
Subject: Re: [TriumphTrophy] Headlight relay help requested

Congratulations on a job well done! That's a pretty major job. I seem to
remember past post of standard auto shop relays working. Except they had a
different pinout. You might be able to juggle around the wires in the
socket. Which would be better than cutting and splicing.

 
 
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Re: Headlight relay help requested

nort75mk3
In reply to this post by gandrews2
see if you can google a cross reference your relay # with a bosch or  
siemens relay .........
 
 
Tim
 
 
In a message dated 3/28/2014 1:22:49 P.M. Central Daylight Time,  
[hidden email] writes:

 
 
 
Hi Guys, Thanks for the replies. I took Gordan's number to Auto Zone and  
O'Reilly's auto parts. Neither one had even that number listed in their data  
base. They would put in the number and all it would spit back was no
"search  number found." I know it is a good number because it is the same relay I
used  on the Johnson Jolt.  
Auto Zone had a generic relay that looks similar on the little diagram,  
except it is a 40 amp relay instead of 30 amp. I will try it but I don't want  
to leave it in there.
Have you got any non Hella numbers I can give to the dumb auto parts  
stores?
By the way, what is with all the female workers in the auto parts stores.  
It used to be all guys.
Greg



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Re: Headlight relay help requested - Hella #s

slovcan
Here is what I posted a while ago with the Hella relay numbers I used. No re-configuring of plug terminals is required. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TriumphTrophy/conversations/topics/84677 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TriumphTrophy/conversations/topics/84677

 Cheers,
 Glenn
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Re: Headlight relay help requested

rod999_5@yahoo.co.uk
In reply to this post by djacarr@sky.com
Very nice quality instructions. Great job.:-)

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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Re: Headlight relay help requested

adeux60
I just go to my auto store and ask for a relay - then I ask them for the different one....I buy both and throw one away..... A2
 

 

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Re: Headlight relay help requested

adeux60
And don't forget to mount the relay the A2 way up rather than the triumph way up to avoid them filling with water.

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Re: Headlight relay help requested

rebullet
In reply to this post by adeux60
Can you throw the good spare ones my way next time please?
 Joan

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Re: Headlight relay help requested

JackM-2
In reply to this post by gandrews2
Hi Greg,
I ran into the same problem with the Hella relay availability.
You can use Wells # 19878, available from Kragen/O'Reilly's and probably elsewhere, but you do have to switch the positions of the blue/orange wire with the brown wire. (Disclaimer : that's for a US spec 2001 Trophy 900 - I'm sure variances may occur)

I swapped out both high and low circuits about two years ago when my high circuit failed and I had trouble locating a Hella for a reasonable cost. Once I did the swap for the high beams, the low beam was exactly the same. Now i can find those relays anywhere, and they're cheap.

Good luck sir.
Jack
Placerville, CA
(Hangtown USA)