Coolant overflow on shut down

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Coolant overflow on shut down

dekspencer
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Re: Coolant overflow on shut down

Samuel Crider
Greeting,

Make sure that whenever you do a coolant flush. That you remove the drain
bolt in the side of the cylinder water jacket. I had similar gremlin's that
vanished after draining a vast amount of undisclosed orange/brown muck out.
It is the only way to get it out other than to pull the head. I find that
the beast tends to normally run a bit on the hot side. So a product such as
water wetter is also a good idea.

Plus wiring in a hidden manual fan bypass doesn't hurt as well. Then you
can turn it on before the major heat load builds. Which is especially
useful in traffic jams in the summer. If you live in a hot area carry extra
drinking water. Believe me it can be a life saver for both the bike and
rider.

Also its a good idea to allow the beast to cool some prior to shutting
down. It should only require a few minutes of slightly above idle running
to do the trick. Again the manual fan override comes in handy in a rush.
And a temp gauge can really come in handy allowing you have a visual on the
situation. It you shut her down while she is too hot it will promote
superheating. Which may have been the condition you experienced.


Best wishes,
Samuel
NOLA
96 BBBB PB

On Tue, Jun 4, 2019, 9:05 AM dekspencer [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy] <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi
> I went on my first 100 mile run on my Trophy 1200 since I have finished
> refurbishing it. On my return to my garage, after switching the engine off
> coolant from the expansion overflowed onto the floor. Taking the seat off
> the fluid was bubbling in the tank. The cooling fan kicked in. When things
> cooled a bit I found very grimie dirty water in the tank. The bike was fine
> for the first half of the journey. At the brew stop all ok. I didn't go
> above sixty on the way back so the engine was thrashed. I would appreciate
> any suggestions. The bike has done over 77000 miles but runs great and is
> in
> excellent condition now with many replacement parts.
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://triumph-trophy.10955.n7.nabble.com/
>
>
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: dekspencer <[hidden email]>
> ------------------------------------
>
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>
On Tue, Jun 4, 2019, 9:05 AM dekspencer [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy] <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi
> I went on my first 100 mile run on my Trophy 1200 since I have finished
> refurbishing it. On my return to my garage, after switching the engine off
> coolant from the expansion overflowed onto the floor. Taking the seat off
> the fluid was bubbling in the tank. The cooling fan kicked in. When things
> cooled a bit I found very grimie dirty water in the tank. The bike was fine
> for the first half of the journey. At the brew stop all ok. I didn't go
> above sixty on the way back so the engine was thrashed. I would appreciate
> any suggestions. The bike has done over 77000 miles but runs great and is
> in
> excellent condition now with many replacement parts.
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://triumph-trophy.10955.n7.nabble.com/
>
>
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: dekspencer <[hidden email]>
> ------------------------------------
>
> List guidelines: PLEASE NO grumpy replies, or replies which merely add
> agreement to a previous post. If a reply is only relevant to the original
> writer, please REPLY DIRECT to that person. No SPAM, no adult-oriented
> topics, and no postings of a political or commercial nature are allowed,
> except for personal items for sale/wanted. Please trim old messages to a
> minimum when replying.
>
>
> Post message: [hidden email]
> Subscribe:  [hidden email]
> Unsubscribe:  [hidden email]
> List owner:  [hidden email]
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>
>
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Re: Coolant overflow on shut down

Bud Izen
In reply to this post by dekspencer
I certainly support the idea of adding a fan cutout bypass switch as
well as a temp gage. There is a lot of info in the file section that
should help you in doing that. If you are uncertain, just post up. I am
pretty typical, I think, in that I have added a voltmeter and matching
temp guage (temp gauge mounted on the left fairing, voltmeter on the
right), a 12v auxiliary outlet on the right, an additional fuse panel
for all the add-ons that switches on and off with the ignition key,
louder horns, relays for the horns and headlights and to activate the
aux. fuse panel and of course a fan cutout bypass switch. Also
additional wiring to power my portable music player and Garmin GPS, both
of those switched on and off through the aux. fuse panel. I also changed
my headlights to HID a couple of years ago. Very worthwhile as I now
have much more visibility at night, while reducing the load on the
alternator and main fuse panel.

Since my background is in electronics, I should have known better, but
not too long after I got my bike, I changed out the headlights to
something like 100/80 watts. (It was quite a number of years ago, so I
am not certain, but the current draw was a LOT more than the stock
lights). Anyway, for some reason it took about three years or so for the
excessive wattage draw to literally melt fuse number 1 in the stock fuse
panel. I ended up replacing the stock panel, and then did the changeover
to HIDs. Highly recommended. I sourced the lights on eBay. I think they
were less than $50 or so. It was a bit of a job to change them out as
you have to remove a LOT of things in the front of the bike.

I have made other mods as well, including adding a Scottoiler with high
capacity touring reservoir,  handlebar risers, and an adapter that
allows me to use different handlebars instead of the stock ones. I also
had Rick Mayer (no longer in business as far as I know) to customize the
saddle.

Between the higher bars with a bit more pullback, and the custom seat, I
have done many 600+ mile days and could have easily kept going. Before
the seat and handlebar changes, the bike was just agony to me and I
clearly remember when I first got it, having to stop every hour to rest
my butt and hands.

Oh, and I also put Racetech springs and gold cartridge emulator (or
something) in the front end which improved the handling and shock
absorption of the front end tremendously.

I also changed most, but not all, of the running and tail lights to
LEDs.  I want to put ultrabright LEDs in the turn signal indicators but
tearing apart the dash again is something I will wait to do for a while.

Oh, and a VERY important mod, if you do your own work or if not, and you
don't want your mechanic to hate you, you should modify the airbox so
you can remove and replace it far more easily. That's a zero cost mod
that will pay you back in spades every time you have to do some carb work.

None of these mods was particularly difficult. Running the additional
wires and installing the relays was time consuming but not hard.

That's about all I can think of now. The point being is that this is a
superb bike, which you can make even better without breaking the bank.

I've had mine since 2001, so that makes it the bike I have owned the
longest and it is certainly the best bike I have owned. All my rides are
solo, and I prefer deserted back roads. In 18 years, the bike has never
let me down, not once. The worst thing that ever happened was getting a
flat in Yosemite last spring. Hardly a disaster!

I am always glad to answer questions, as are most of the older members.
There's not as much daily activity on this board as there used to be as
most of the older members have long sorted out their bikes and have
figured out most of the quirks. Many of us still like helping out the
newbies who are discovering what a great bike these are, and what
bargains they are when purchased used.

Happy Trails.......

Bud Izen

Springfield Oregon

'99 Platinum 900






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Re: Coolant overflow on shut down

dekspencer
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Re: Coolant overflow on shut down

dekspencer
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Re: Coolant overflow on shut down

apsllp@bellsouth.net
In reply to this post by Bud Izen
Bud,  I'm currently on a phone and unable to get to the files. Can you send me a .pdf drawing of how you wired in the fan switch and gauges?  
Thanks,  
Bob Clark 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 
  On Thu, Jun 6, 2019 at 2:17 AM, Bud Izen [hidden email] [TriumphTrophy]<[hidden email]> wrote:      
I certainly support the idea of adding a fan cutout bypass switch as
well as a temp gage. There is a lot of info in the file section that
should help you in doing that. If you are uncertain, just post up. I am
pretty typical, I think, in that I have added a voltmeter and matching
temp guage (temp gauge mounted on the left fairing, voltmeter on the
right), a 12v auxiliary outlet on the right, an additional fuse panel
for all the add-ons that switches on and off with the ignition key,
louder horns, relays for the horns and headlights and to activate the
aux. fuse panel and of course a fan cutout bypass switch. Also
additional wiring to power my portable music player and Garmin GPS, both
of those switched on and off through the aux. fuse panel. I also changed
my headlights to HID a couple of years ago. Very worthwhile as I now
have much more visibility at night, while reducing the load on the
alternator and main fuse panel.

Since my background is in electronics, I should have known better, but
not too long after I got my bike, I changed out the headlights to
something like 100/80 watts. (It was quite a number of years ago, so I
am not certain, but the current draw was a LOT more than the stock
lights). Anyway, for some reason it took about three years or so for the
excessive wattage draw to literally melt fuse number 1 in the stock fuse
panel. I ended up replacing the stock panel, and then did the changeover
to HIDs. Highly recommended. I sourced the lights on eBay. I think they
were less than $50 or so. It was a bit of a job to change them out as
you have to remove a LOT of things in the front of the bike.

I have made other mods as well, including adding a Scottoiler with high
capacity touring reservoir,  handlebar risers, and an adapter that
allows me to use different handlebars instead of the stock ones. I also
had Rick Mayer (no longer in business as far as I know) to customize the
saddle.

Between the higher bars with a bit more pullback, and the custom seat, I
have done many 600+ mile days and could have easily kept going. Before
the seat and handlebar changes, the bike was just agony to me and I
clearly remember when I first got it, having to stop every hour to rest
my butt and hands.

Oh, and I also put Racetech springs and gold cartridge emulator (or
something) in the front end which improved the handling and shock
absorption of the front end tremendously.

I also changed most, but not all, of the running and tail lights to
LEDs.  I want to put ultrabright LEDs in the turn signal indicators but
tearing apart the dash again is something I will wait to do for a while.

Oh, and a VERY important mod, if you do your own work or if not, and you
don't want your mechanic to hate you, you should modify the airbox so
you can remove and replace it far more easily. That's a zero cost mod
that will pay you back in spades every time you have to do some carb work.

None of these mods was particularly difficult. Running the additional
wires and installing the relays was time consuming but not hard.

That's about all I can think of now. The point being is that this is a
superb bike, which you can make even better without breaking the bank.

I've had mine since 2001, so that makes it the bike I have owned the
longest and it is certainly the best bike I have owned. All my rides are
solo, and I prefer deserted back roads. In 18 years, the bike has never
let me down, not once. The worst thing that ever happened was getting a
flat in Yosemite last spring. Hardly a disaster!

I am always glad to answer questions, as are most of the older members.
There's not as much daily activity on this board as there used to be as
most of the older members have long sorted out their bikes and have
figured out most of the quirks. Many of us still like helping out the
newbies who are discovering what a great bike these are, and what
bargains they are when purchased used.

Happy Trails.......

Bud Izen

Springfield Oregon

'99 Platinum 900






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Re: Coolant overflow on shut down

Tom D.
In reply to this post by Bud Izen
Hello Bud,          It's Tom Donovan 1999 BRG BBBB 80K-plus!
 I would also suggest that when flushing your cooling system you perform a final flush with "steam distilled" water. And if you are not using a premix coolant, you should also use steam distilled water to dilute to antifreeze.
 

 Best regards,
 Tom